ABOUT:

Genomics is an increasingly important component of both basic and industry-aligned research. That is why the New Zealand Government established NZGL – so local scientists had local access to the genomics technology and expertise needed to remain internationally competitive. All data is retained onshore, where it is secure and accessible to researchers through NZGL’s IT platform and supported software.

NZGL is a collaboration between three universities – The University of Auckland, Massey University and the University of Otago – supported by the New Zealand Government through the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment.

It is thanks to the significant government and university collaborator support – $70m over 10 years – that many projects qualify for a substantial discount on services.

NZGL’s bioinformaticians understand the needs of New Zealand’s science community, because they are part of it. This is a key benefit of using NZGL: our team provides a personalised service, working alongside researchers to offer customised solutions and on-going support as required.

NZGL provides up to two hours of free advice from the bioinformatics team, as well as the free “Talk to a Bioinformatician” sessions, held regularly on the Auckland, Massey and Otago university campuses. Both of these options can help you work through aspects of your project, such as determining its practicalities, establishing approximate costs and assisting with grant application wording.

click here to download NZGL IMPACTS AND OUTCOMES REPORT 2016 click here to download NZGL eBROCHURE click here to download NZGL INVESTMENT CASE click here to TALK TO A BIOINFORMATICIAN

WHAT DO WE DO?

The vision for NZGL is to have a significant, positive and wide-reaching impact on New Zealand’s national genomics capability, by ensuring New Zealand researchers and innovators have access to large-scale genomics infrastructure. This will include support and knowledge available through a nationwide collaborative approach. In the context of its vision for New Zealand genomics, NZGL will have a three-dimensional role as a facilitator, enabler and investor.

OUR PEOPLE:

NZGL OFFICE TEAM

Sandy Baines

NZGL Chief Operating Officer

Sandy BainesSandy Baines

Sandy has a background in Information and Technology Management and technical engineering, together with formal qualifications in business and project management. Her business consulting experience covers many different sectors including Finance and Banking, Local Government, Health and not for profit (NFP) sectors. She has worked alongside numerous organisations at a strategic level to develop plans to leverage technology and effect positive change to improve service delivery and performance.
Sandy founded Platinum Services Group, a successful Auckland based project management company that specialised in large scale business ICT projects, capability assessments and organisational capability audits. Sandy has also held several high profile Project Director and IT Management roles where she has been responsible for strategy development and management of large programs of work for change.

Email: sandy.baines@nzgenomics.co.nz

Phone: +64 3 4703495

Vacant

Office Manager

VacantVacant

Phone: 03 470 3543

Stephen Craig-Pearson

Accountant

Stephen Craig-PearsonStephen Craig-Pearson

Stephen is a chartered accountant with qualifications from Otago and Massey Universities. His recent experience includes consulting to small- and medium-sized businesses and teaching accountancy. Stephen’s earlier experience included working for international banks and providing advice and arranging finance for public-private partnership projects in the health, education and transport sectors. He began working for NZGL in 2011 as a contractor and was employed full time in 2013.

Email: accountant@nzgenomics.co.nz

Phone: 03 470 3543

Jackie McBride

Acting Business Manager

Jackie McBrideJackie McBride

Jackie has extensive experience in finance and administration having worked in the New Zealand banking sector for more than 20 years. Her previous roles have included supporting commercial managers, preparing documentation, maintaining bank databases, managing portfolios of clients and providing consultancy. Jackie joined NZGL in 2012 and coordinates the customer management system and provides administrative support for the office.
Jackie is currently providing cover for the Business Manager role until April 2016.

Email: business.manager@nzgenomics.co.nz

Phone: 03 470 3543

Russell Smithies

Bio-IT Support Specialist

Russell SmithiesRussell Smithies

Russell completed his BSc in Computer Science in 2004 at Otago University. He worked for AgResearch for 13 years in various IT technical roles, most recently as a Linux Solutions Consultant managing the High Performance Computing environment and storage platform. Russell joined NZGL in 2016 as a Bio IT Specialist. He has expertise in infrastructure support, cloud computing, developing software and UNIX system administration.

Email: russell.smithies@nzgenomics.co.nz

Phone: 03 4703543

Shane Sturrock

NZGL Bio-IT Team Leader

Shane manages the Bio–IT platform, ensuring that software and databases are updated, as well as providing support for end users of the platform. Shane has 27 years’ experience with high performance computing systems and UNIX system administration. He also has a computational biology background and PhD in molecular biology.

Email: shane.sturrock@nzgenomics.co.nz

Phone: 03 4703543

Anthony Thrush
Anthony ThrushAnthony Thrush

Prior to joining NZGL in mid-2014, Anthony had spent his early career in basic and applied research at the CRI HortResearch (now Plant and Food Research) and in the publicly listed biotech company Genesis Research and Development Ltd. For the last 9 years he has been working in commercial aspects of the science industry for a multinational corporation in both basic research and healthcare. This experience has given him a broad understanding of the research environment in New Zealand as well as a detailed understanding of the high end technologies and services offered by NZGL and he looks forward to helping you to further your research programme.

Email: anthony.thrush@nzgenomics.co.nz

Phone: 021 279 7121

NZGL FACILITY MANAGERS

Dr Kelly Atkinson

Auckland Centre for Proteomics, Genomics and Metabolomics

Dr Kelly AtkinsonDr Kelly Atkinson

Kelly has a PhD from The University of Auckland. Her research background is in protein biochemistry, non-invasive sampling and human olfaction. She has specific expertise in performing and administering science within the New Zealand research landscape at academic and commercial organisations. Kelly has managed The University of Auckland’s NZGL operations in genomics and bioinformatics since 2012.

Email: k.atkinson@auckland.ac.nz

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Dr Rubina Jibran

Massey Genome Service

Dr Rubina JibranDr Rubina Jibran

Rubina was awarded her PhD degree from Massey University in 2015. She joined the Massey Genome Service in September 2015. She is a plant molecular biologist and she is interested in learning new advancements in Next Generation sequencing technologies and in helping the scientific community to achieve their research goals. Her research background is in key molecular and genetic regulators of flower death and plant disease resistance. She is developing expertise in Sanger Sequencing using BigDye Terminator Chemistry; Microsatellite, AFLP analysis, and SNP Detection; Next Generation Sequencing Applications; Genomic Sequencing, Transcriptome Analysis, Methylation sequencing, small RNA sequencing and RNA sequence capturing.

Email: mgs-manager@massey.ac.nz

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Dr Rebecca Laurie (on secondment)

Otago Genomics and Bioinformatics Facility

Dr Rebecca Laurie (on secondment)Dr Rebecca Laurie (on secondment)

Becky has a BSc(Hons) from Bath University and a PhD from the University of East
Anglia. She moved to New Zealand in 2003 to take up a postdoctoral position at the University of Otago. Becky was responsible for the Biochemistry department’s plant containment facility for several years and also established a real-time PCR suite. In 2011, Becky joined the Otago Genomics and Bioinformatics Facility and, in conjunction with NZGL, was instrumental in the set up and subsequent expansion of an Illumina HiSeq sequencing service.
Please contact Charlene Gell using the email address below for any enquiries relating to the facility.

Email: genomics@otago.ac.nz

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NZGL BIOINFORMATICIANS

Dr Patrick Biggs (Bioinformatics Team leader)

Senior Lecturer in Computational Biology, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University

Dr Patrick Biggs  (Bioinformatics Team leader)Dr Patrick Biggs  (Bioinformatics Team leader)

Patrick is a senior lecturer in computational biology at Massey University’s Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences. He graduated with a BSc (Hons) in applied biochemistry from Brunel University (UK) in 1992 and a PhD in human cancer genetics from the University of London in 1996. Patrick undertook postdoctoral research in the UK and at Baylor College of Medicine, Texas, before accepting a position at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Cambridge in 2001. He moved to New Zealand in 2007. Patrick’s research interests centre around zoonotic pathogen evolution.

Email: P.Biggs@massey.ac.nz

Associate Professor Mik Black

Biochemistry, University of Otago

Mik completed a BSc (Hons) in statistics from the University of Canterbury in 1996, followed by a Masters in mathematical statistics and a PhD in statistics from Purdue University in 2000 and 2002, respectively. He is involved in a number of collaborative research projects, with an emphasis on the analysis of genomic data relating to human disease. Mik’s research group is computationally oriented and focuses on developing software applications for genomic data analysis and visualisation.

Email: mik.black@otago.ac.nz

Luke Boyle

Bioinformatician

Luke BoyleLuke Boyle

Luke completed Masters research looking at the effects of heat stress on Green-lipped mussels using a combination of RNA-Seq and metabolomics. His interests include population genetics, metagenomics and using gene expression data to better understand biological systems. Luke is also interested in Bioinformatics education and is keen to help people understand the processes involved in Bioinformatics better.

Email: luke.boyle@auckland.ac.nz

Vicky Fan

Bioinformatics Institute Research Programmer, The University of Auckland

Vicky FanVicky Fan

Vicky completed her MSc (Hons) in biological sciences, specialising in bioinformatics, at the University of Auckland in 2009. Her MSc thesis focused on the genomic and proteomic analysis of New Zealand triplefin fish. Vicky’s research interests include microarray analysis, developing software for R and internet programming.

Email: v.fan@auckland.ac.nz

Gregory Gimenez

Bioinformatician, University of Otago

Gregory GimenezGregory Gimenez

Gregory studied at the Postgraduate School of Engineering in Marseille, majoring in bioinformatics. He then joined the European Bioinformatics Institute (UK), where he dealt with protein interaction network, before being recruited as a bioinformatics software engineer by a German RNAi company. In 2005, he returned to academic research, at France’s Institute of Developmental Biology, where he worked on a web application for model organism comparisons. Gregory moved to the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique and Networks (CNRS) in 2007, as a bioinformatics research assistant on next-generation sequencing. Gregory joined the University of Otago’s Genomics and Bioinformatics Facility in 2013.

Email: gregory.gimenez@otago.ac.nz

Dan Jones

Bioinformatician, The University of Auckland

Dan JonesDan Jones

Dan has a BSc from The University of Auckland and a MSc, jointly undertaken with the CRI, Scion. He is currently completing his PhD through Melbourne’s La Trobe University. His doctoral project focuses on de novo genome sequencing of a fungal fruit pathogen, genome-genome comparisons of predicted secretomes and peptide mass fingerprinting to support in silico gene predictions. Dan also has experience in analysis of targeted exome sequencing of ryegrass, transcriptome sequencing of tobacco, genome assembly workflows and quality metrics. He has a particular interest for bioinformatics education.

Email: dan.jones@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Elizabeth Permina

Bioinformatician, University of Otago

Dr Elizabeth PerminaDr Elizabeth Permina

Elizabeth completed her BSc in biochemistry at Moscow State University, before graduating with a PhD in molecular biology from Moscow’s State Genetics Center in 2006. She later held a postdoctoral position in the Institute for General Genetics, where she studied bacterial regulatory systems via comparative genomics approach and microarray data analysis. Elizabeth has been a visiting scientist to French research institution INRIA, within its Algorithms and Models for Integrative Biology Project Team. She has also spent time at the Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics (India) and Lawrence National Berkeley Laboratory, University of Berkeley.

Email: elizabeth.permina@otago.ac.nz

Dr Louis Ranjard

Bioinformatics Research Fellow, The University of Auckland

Dr Louis RanjardDr Louis Ranjard

Louis completed a BSc and MSc in biological sciences and computer science at France’s University of Poitiers in 2000 and 2001, respectively. He then graduated with a second Masters – this time in bioinformatics – from the University of Evry (France) in 2004. Louis graduated with a PhD in computational biology from The University of Auckland in 2010 and spent the following two years as a postdoctoral fellow in statistics at the university. He is now a bioinformatics research fellow, with specific interests in phylogeography and population genetics.

Email: l.ranjard@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Sebastian Schmeier

Bioinformatics and Genomics Lecturer, Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University (Albany)

Dr Sebastian SchmeierDr Sebastian Schmeier

Sebastian’s BSc and MSc in bioinformatics were undertaken at Freie University (Berlin), before he completed a PhD in bioinformatics at the South African National Bioinformatics Institute at the University of the Western Cape. He continued on to a postdoctoral position at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia, during which time he was a visiting scholar at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and a visiting scientist at Japan’s RIKEN Yokohama Institute. Sebastian’s research interests are in gene regulation, epigenetics, network biology, translational biology and human diseases.

Email: s.schmeier@massey.ac.nz

Dr Peter Stockwell

Biochemistry Scientific Officer, University of Otago

Dr Peter StockwellDr Peter Stockwell

Peter completed a BSc (Hons) in biochemistry at Otago in 1972, before undertaking a PhD in the same department. Initial projects in protein sequencing were overtaken by computational work on population genetics and DNA sequence processing. Peter’s area of expertise includes tools for extracting and using feature table information for genomic sequences. He also researches the use and development of software for processing bisulphite sequence data to establish methylation status.

Email: peter.stockwell@otago.ac.nz

Alex Stuckey

Bioinformatician

Alex completed his MSc in biological sciences at the University of Auckland in 2014. His MSc thesis investigated the past population history of Adelie penguins and how the population has responded to climate change. Prior to joining the team he worked as a beekeeper which fostered an interest in honeybee health and genetics. His interests include human evolution, population genetics and honeybees.

Email: a.stuckey@auckland.ac.nz

Peter Tsai

Bioinformatics Institute Research Programmer, The University of Auckland


Peter TsaiPeter Tsai

Peter completed his MSc specialising in bioinformatics at The University of Auckland in 2008. He was appointed by the university’s Bioinformatics Institute as a research programmer, focusing on next-generation sequencing data. Peter’s areas of expertise involve genome mapping, variant detection, RNA-sequencing and analysing of environmental metagenomics data.

Email: p.tsai@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Dave Wheeler

Bioinformatics and Genomics Lecturer, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, Massey University

Dr Dave WheelerDr Dave Wheeler

Dave graduated with a PhD in genetics from the University of Adelaide in 2003 , before undertaking postdoctoral work at Melbourne University, Kansas State University and the University of Rochester (USA). His postdoctoral projects focused on using next-generation sequencing technologies to study gene functions in non-model systems. Dave’s research interests are insect host parasite interactions and ecological genomics.

Email: D.Wheeler@massey.ac.nz

NZGL BOARD

Graham Crombie

Independent Chair

Graham is a chartered accountant and independent director based in Dunedin. He is a past President and current Chair of the New Zealand Institute of Chartered Accountants and sits on the joint Australia/New Zealand Chartered Accountants Board. Graham chairs the Dunedin City Holding Company Ltd and Dunedin City Treasury Ltd, Otago Museum and Action Engineering. He is also a director of Surf Life Saving New Zealand and a trustee for the Kokiri Centre and the Orokonui Foundation Trust.

Nicola Williams

Independent Deputy Chair

Nicola is a Dunedin-based Barrister, specialising in family law. She is a past Deputy Chair of the New Zealand Law Society Family Law Section executive and current Chair of the St Hilda's Collegiate School Board of Trustees.

Distinguished Professor Bill Denny

Distinguished Professor Bill Denny is Co-Director of the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre and a Principal Investigator in the Maurice Wilkins Centre, University of Auckland. He is a Director of ESR, and a scientific co-founder of Proacta Inc. He has experience in drug development, and is a Past-President of the NZ Institute of Chemistry and the NZ Society for Oncology, and a Rutherford Medallist of the Royal Society of NZ.

Professor Richard Blaikie

Richard is a Professor in Physics and University of Otago Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research and Enterprise). He has a BSc (Hons) from Otago and a PhD in physics from the University of Cambridge. Richard was a visiting scientist at the Hitachi Cambridge Laboratory, investigating single-electron transport effects in semiconductor nanostructures, before returning to New Zealand in 1993 to take up a position at the University of Canterbury. From 2008 to 2011, he was director of the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology. Richard’s research field is applied electromagnetics.

Professor Simon Hall

Simon is head of Massey University’s Institute of Fundamental Sciences and Principal Investigator with the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology. He has significant experience in the commercialisation of science and, alongside his academic commitments, is Chief Technical Officer for Synthodics Ltd – a company he co-established with Massey University and colleagues to commercialise an energy storage application. In 2010, Simon was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, UK.

TECHNICAL ADVISORY GROUP

Professor Grant Montgomery

Convenor

Grant spent 20 years in animal science in New Zealand, before taking up a position in medical research in Australia in 1999. He is a National Health and Medical Research Council principal research fellow and group leader at Australia’s QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, where he runs a molecular genetics laboratory mapping genes for common human diseases. Grant has conducted genome-wide association studies on more than 40,000 individuals and located novel genomic regions contributing to risk for endometriosis, inflammatory bowel disease, melanoma, asthma, depression, colon cancer and substance abuse. Follow-up projects include functional studies and DNA sequencing. Grant has a PhD from Massey University and completed a post-doc at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research.

Dr Tony Conner

Tony is AgResearch’s Science Group Leader for Forage Improvement. Since graduating with a PhD in genetics from the University of California, Davis, Tony’s research career has focused on applying plant biotechnology and genomics technology to improving crop performance, and the integration of such technologies into plant breeding programmes. He is recognised internationally for his work in this area, as well as the assessment of environmental and food safety risks of genetically-improved crops. Tony joined AgResearch in 2011 after almost 30 years with Plant & Food Research. His group focuses on the underpinning science and plant breeding research required to create high-performance forage legume and grass cultivars for New Zealand farms and the international market. Tony is a Fellow of the New Zealand Institute of Agricultural & Horticultural Science and the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Associate Professor Murray Cox

Murray is a computational biologist specialising in genomics, computer modeling and statistical inference. He spent nearly 10 years working overseas – at the Universities of Oslo, Cambridge and Arizona, and the Santa Fe Institute for Complexity Science – before returning to New Zealand in 2009. He is currently Associate Professor of Computational Biology in Massey University’s Institute of Fundamental Sciences. Murray is also an investigator in two Centres of Research Excellence – the BioProtection Research Centre and Te Pūnaha Matatini – and an inaugural Rutherford Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Associate Professor Marcel Dinger

Marcel is head of the Kinghorn Centre for Clinical Genomics (KCCG) at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney and conjoint Associate Professor at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) Australia. KCCG was one of the first sites in the world to implement the HiSeq X Ten genome-sequencing platform, which has capacity to sequence 18,000 whole human genomes annually. The centre’s goal is to establish genomic medicine in routine healthcare and to leverage clinical genomic data for research. Marcel also heads the Genome Informatics Laboratory, which aims to unlock the clinical value of noncoding regions of the genome. He has worked in informatics and genomics since 1998, in both commercial and academic capacities.

Dr Rhys Francis

Since 2006, Rhys has worked within the Australian Government’s National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy – initially as facilitator for its eResearch investment plan and later Australian eResearch Infrastructure Council executive director. He is now developing an Australian eResearch Framework to assist the government in planning national eResearch infrastructure. Rhys completed a PhD in computer science at La Trobe University and continued into academia. In 1990, he joined Australia’s science agency CSIRO as a research scientist, before becoming a research programme manager and then the organisation’s ICT sector leader and High Performance Scientific Computing director. In 2005, Rhys took up the role of program manager for the APAC (Australian Partnership for Advanced Computing) National Grid and, the following year, he undertook the facilitation activity that produced the national eResearch investment plan, implemented in 2007.

John McEwan

John initially trained as a biochemist at the University of Otago, although his research today is primarily in agricultural genetics and genomics. He has worked for AgResearch and its forebears since 1979 and has been involved in the creation and ongoing development of high-density SNP chips for use in sheep research and as a commercial genetic selection tool. John’s work in genomic selection has contributed towards a variety of single gene tests and genomic breeding values for more 25 separate sheep traits. His current projects include the genetics of methane emissions in sheep and cattle and carcass quality traits in sheep. John is also involved in the next generation of cheaper genotyping assays, using sequencing technology, primarily for use in plant and aquaculture species.

Professor Cris Print
Professor Cris PrintProfessor Cris Print

Cris is director of the Bioinformatics Institute at The University of Auckland. He completed an MBChB at the university in 1996, before spending a year in clinical work and researching asthma at the University of Otago. He then returned to Auckland to complete a PhD in molecular immunology and worked overseas for 10 years – at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne and, later, at Cambridge University. Cris co-founded a Japan-based biotechnology company, using bioinformatics and genomics in drug development, before returning to New Zealand in 2005. He uses genomics and bioinformatics extensively in his research area – the molecular pathology of human cancer.

Dr Richard Spelman

Richard is chief scientist at LIC, the New Zealand dairy-farmer owned cooperative that provides support services and products for its farmer shareholders. Richard joined LIC as an analyst within its livestock selection division, before undertaking a Master of Agricultural Science (Hons) at Massey University. His studies focused on the application of genomic data in dairy cattle breeding schemes. After completing a PhD in animal breeding and genetics from the Netherlands’ Wageningen University, Richard returned to LIC in 1998. He now leads the organisation’s research into and application of genomic selection in the New Zealand dairy population. LIC has genotyped more than 120 thousand dairy animals and undertaken whole genome sequencing on more than 700 animals.

Professor Stephen Robertson

Stephen is the Cure Kids Chair in Child Health Research at the University of Otago. He is also a paediatrician and clinical geneticist with the Central and Southern Regional Genetics Service and consults on families and individuals with known or suspected genetic disease. Stephen is director and head of the Clinical Genetics Research Group within the University of Otago’s Department of Women’s and Children’s Health. He was awarded the Royal Society of New Zealand’s Liley Medal in 2010 for his fourth research paper published in the prestigious journal, Nature Genetics. This paper questioned the dogma that germline mutations in a tumour suppressor gene predispose an individual to cancer. Stephen has a special interest in the genetic determinants of congenital malformations in humans and the ethical considerations of the clinical application of genetic knowledge.

PROJECT ADVISORY GROUP

Professor Cris Print

Convenor

Professor Cris PrintProfessor Cris Print

Cris is director of the Bioinformatics Institute at The University of Auckland. He completed an MBChB at the university in 1996, before spending a year in clinical work and researching asthma at the University of Otago. He then returned to Auckland to complete a PhD in molecular immunology and worked overseas for 10 years – at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne and, later, at Cambridge University. Cris co-founded a Japan-based biotechnology company, using bioinformatics and genomics in drug development, before returning to New Zealand in 2005. He uses genomics and bioinformatics extensively in his research area – the molecular pathology of human cancer.

Dr Patrick Biggs

Senior Lecturer in Computational Biology, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Massey University

Dr Patrick BiggsDr Patrick Biggs

Patrick is a senior lecturer in computational biology at Massey University’s Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences. He graduated with a BSc (Hons) in applied biochemistry from Brunel University (UK) in 1992 and a PhD in human cancer genetics from the University of London in 1996. Patrick undertook postdoctoral research in the UK and at Baylor College of Medicine, Texas, before accepting a position at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Cambridge in 2001. He moved to New Zealand in 2007. Patrick’s research interests centre around zoonotic pathogen evolution.

Email: P.Biggs@massey.ac.nz

Dr Austen Ganley
Dr Austen GanleyDr Austen Ganley

Austen is a senior lecturer in genetics and evolution at Massey University’s Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences. He completed his BSc (Hons) and PhD in genetics at Massey University, before taking up postdoctoral positions at Duke University (North Carolina, USA), the National Institute of Basic Biology (Okazaki, Japan), and the National Institute of Genetics (Mishima, Japan), where he became an Assistant Professor. Austen returned to New Zealand in 2007 and is the Genetics major leader at Massey University’s Albany campus. His research focuses on the ribosomal DNA gene repeats in eukaryotes. He uses both molecular and bioinformatics techniques to understand more about the biology and evolution of these enigmatic parts of the genome. This work has led to seminal advances in our understanding of recombination regulation, repeat evolution, and aging – and has contributed to completing the human genome sequence.

Dr Rebecca Laurie
Dr Rebecca LaurieDr Rebecca Laurie

Rebecca has a BSc(Hons) from Bath University and a PhD from the University of East Anglia. She moved to New Zealand in 2003 to take up a postdoctoral position at the University of Otago. Rebecca was responsible for the Biochemistry department's plant containment facility for several years and also established a real-time PCR suite. In 2011, Rebecca joined the Otago Genomics and Bioinformatics Facility and, in conjunction with NZGL, was instrumental in the set up and subsequent expansion of an Illumina HiSeq sequencing service.

ADVISORS TO BIOINFORMATICIANS

Professor Cris Print
Professor Cris PrintProfessor Cris Print

Cris is director of the Bioinformatics Institute at The University of Auckland. He completed an MBChB at the university in 1996, before spending a year in clinical work and researching asthma at the University of Otago. He then returned to Auckland to complete a PhD in molecular immunology and worked overseas for 10 years – at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne and, later, at Cambridge University. Cris co-founded a Japan-based biotechnology company, using bioinformatics and genomics in drug development, before returning to New Zealand in 2005. He uses genomics and bioinformatics extensively in his research area – the molecular pathology of human cancer.

Dr Austen Ganley

Senior lecturer in genetics and evolution at Massey University’s Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences

Dr Austen GanleyDr Austen Ganley

Austen is a senior lecturer in genetics and evolution at Massey University’s Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences. He completed his BSc (Hons) and PhD in genetics at Massey University, before taking up postdoctoral positions at Duke University (North Carolina, USA), the National Institute of Basic Biology (Okazaki, Japan), and the National Institute of Genetics (Mishima, Japan), where he became an Assistant Professor. Austen returned to New Zealand in 2007 and is the Genetics major leader at Massey University’s Albany campus. His research focuses on the ribosomal DNA gene repeats in eukaryotes. He uses both molecular and bioinformatics techniques to understand more about the biology and evolution of these enigmatic parts of the genome. This work has led to seminal advances in our understanding of recombination regulation, repeat evolution, and aging – and has contributed to completing the human genome sequence.

Professor James Curran
Professor James CurranProfessor James Curran

James is co-director of the Bioinformatics Institute at The University of Auckland. He completed a PhD at Auckland, before taking up a two-year research fellowship with Professor Bruce Weir, at North Carolina State University. James returned to New Zealand in 1999 to take up a post as a lecturer in the Department of Statistics at the University of Waikato. He joined The University of Auckland's Department of Statistics as a senior lecturer in 2005.

A COLLABORATION OF:

WITH THE SUPPORT OF:

Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment